Tips for Eating Out on Tournament Weekends

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Travel eating, eating out, and eating on the go are a part of every hockey player’s life. You can help your skater learn how to make hockey strong fueling choices all the time.
Did you know if your son or daughter eats fast food on a regular basis this can negatively impact their performance on the ice? Fast food contains ingredients which can promote inflammation in their growing body. Ingredients like trans-fat, saturated fat, and high fructose corn syrup. Inflammation can cause your skater’s muscles to feel sore and recover slower after games and practices. Inflammation in their body can lead to decreased ability to fight off colds, flu and infections which will lead to missed practices and games.
At times fast food stops are simply unavoidable so learn to choose “hockey strong” foods even at the drive through window.
Make it a habit to choose the following items:
• Water or low fat milk
• Fruit smoothies
• Oatmeal
• Order grilled chicken or fish in place of the crispy or fried option.
• Add fruits and vegetables in place of French fries
• Request salad dressing on the side and use half of the amount provided
• Order eggs with toast and fruit, omit the cheese and meat to decrease the fat content.
• Choose Bagels (plain, cinnamon raisin) or English muffins instead of a croissant or biscuit which are much higher in fat.
If you can plan in advance; check the restaurant menu online and make a list of what your skater will eat. This is a great idea when you are planning a team dinner. You can use the restaurant finder button on every rink page on HockeyClan! Just find your rink and click the find nearby restaurants button, then from the map, click the restaurant and find a menu.
Use this simple math tip to help your skater make better, low fat choices. For every 100 calories there should be 3 g of fat or less.
For example a grilled chicken sandwich with 350 calories should contain 9-10g of fat or less. Here is an example, let’s say you find a sandwich that contains 400 calories, using the 3 g of fat per 100 calories, how many grams of fat should this sandwich contain to be considered a low fat option for your skater? …. 4 x 3 = 12, so 12 g of fat or less for this sandwich. Use this math tip to help your skater make optimum fueling choices while eating out. Many fast food restaurants have incorporated lower fat options to their menus.
Small changes add up; don’t panic if you MUST eat out when you are on the road. Over time you and your youth ice hockey player can learn how to eat on the go without the food choices negatively impacting their performance on the ice.
Remember great nutrition leads to great performance. Visit www.hockeymomrd.com for more youth ice hockey nutrition tips and recipes.
Happy Skating,
Kim Lukhard, Hockey Mom RD
HockeyClan Blogger

Author of Amazon’s Best Selling Hockey Book Eat, Skate, Win: 7 Steps For Your Youth Ice Hockey Star To Eat Like A Champion.

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